FinTech Weekly Magazine

  • While Fintech companies were initially viewed as a banking competitor, the two are finding that there is greater benefit to working together. According to the 2017 World Retail Banking Report, 91 percent of banks and 75 percent of Fintechs responded that they expect to partner with one another in the future.

  • Since moving from telecoms into the financial services industry, I have observed that there are a number of lessons that we can take from the disruptive approach we adopted at Skype and change the way our sector operates. In particular, the way we used technology and prioritised core services in my previous line of work can be applied to data management and change standardise large parts of the sector.

  • The past few years have been a technology roller coaster ride for financial services companies. From heightened cybersecurity threats to increased demands from customers on the digital front, the very rules that defined the industry have changed. And 2018 will be no different.

  • From hype to crash – in light of the most recent exchange rate developments of Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple & Co., disillusionment is reigning on the crypto market. Volatile exchange rates, black sheep amongst traders and the learning that trading with crypto currencies is actually not as easy as buying a lottery ticket, have certainly put a damper on the gold rush atmosphere. Pressure is growing on the crypto traders – most of all because of regulations.

  • Blockchain has been touted as a disruptive technology that can be used to benefit virtually any transaction, ranging from money transmission to supply chain management, to restaurant reservations. With its promise of highly secure, private and instantaneous transactions, blockchain would seem to enhance any transfer or transaction.

  • Financial services companies are growing through an intense period of acquisitions and mergers. This has resulted in requiring a parent company to maintain IT infrastructures for several different organizations, each with their own lines of business.

  • Capital has been flowing into the alternative investment industry over the past few years, with sources projecting that money invested in private funds will reach as much as $20 trillion by 2020. Preqin recently published a study stating that there are as many as 17,000 private funds open for investment.

  • The increased interest and excitement towards cryptocurrencies has resulted in an influx of new money flowing into the cryptocurrency market. However, entering into the crypto world is extremely intimidating, especially when you’re dealing with a subject matter that is technically complex. With many making a considerable rate or return on their investments, it is vital to understand how we should value our crypto gains (or losses).

  • If there is one topic setting tongues wagging in FinTech, it is blockchain. Because of its distributed ledger system, Blockchain makes processes easier, faster and by extension, cheaper. Bitcoin is only one case among the many applications of crypto. Once its potential is fully explored, blockchain could generate much more than digital money, and empower individuals by putting them in full control of their money and transactions.

  • On 13 January 2018, the starting pistol was fired for the Open Banking race. Retail banks (and building societies) are now required, with their customers’ consent, to provide access to their customers’ banking data to approved third parties in a standardised, straightforward and secure way. Open Banking has been hailed as a catalyst for the Fintech sector, facilitating innovative new banking apps and services for consumers and small businesses.

  • Many banking and finance companies have already taken advantage of big data analytics to simplify the process of personalized offers, targeted cross sales and to improve their customer service. The term big data keeps expanding and today incorporates numerous new meanings, such as Deep Learning, Cluster Analysis, Neuron Networks and Artificial Intelligence.

  • PSD2 - the second Payment Services Directive - offers European consumers significant control over the use of their personal financial data. But while they trust their banks with this sensitive data, a recent Accenture study shows that consumers are overwhelmingly reluctant to share their bank details with third-parties. So how can fintech companies generate trust and encourage consumers to sign-up? I believe empowering consumers to manage their own data could be the answer.

  • As the digital asset community tries to project how the world’s governments and agencies will ultimately regulate the cascade of coins and tokens now being blockchained into existence, we could use a good anecdote. Do we have a relatively recent story that features large quantities of regulatory uncertainty, customer frenzy and start-up obsession? One that might illuminate basic truths that help token investors and issuers navigate the unusual regulatory landscape they find themselves trying to cross? In fact we do. The story of daily fantasy sports companies during the second half of 2015 offers the digital asset community several valuable insights.

  • ‘Mobile payments’ is a broad term. As the ecosystem has developed, various new technologies have emerged to change the way we act and transact in-store.